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Archives: "R" PDF Files

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Military Archives: "R" PDF Files

Below are PDF files available to download. A small fee is charged for some, others are free to download. All are downloaded from the same source, Payhip, and free and fee items can be combined in a single order.
  • Rangers: Selected Combat Operations in World War II - FREE
    • by Dr. Michael J. King, Leavenworth Paper No. 11, Combat Studies Institute, U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, June 1985, 94 pages, 7 photos, 6 maps, 2 organization charts. Contents: Introduction; Origin of the Rangers; Djebel el Ank; Porto Empedocle; Cisterna; Zerf; Cabanatuan; Notes; Bibliography.
  • Rank and Badges in the Navy, Army, RAF and Auxiliaries - FREE
    • by E.C. Talbot-Booth, Editor, George Philip & Son, Ltd., London, 1943, 32 pages, 366 color drawings. A fully colored wartime guide to the badges worn by members of His Majesty's Forces. Contents:  Royal Navy; Royal Naval Reserve; Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve; Royal Marines; Merchant Navy; H.M. Coastguard; Army; Royal Air Force; Auxiliary and Miscellaneous; British Red Cross Society; St. John Ambulance Brigade; Women's Royal Naval Service; Auxiliary Territorial Service; Women's Auxiliary Air Force; National Fire Service; Civil Defence General Services.
  • Ravishing the Women of Conquered Europe - FREE
    • by Dr. Austin J. App, Ph.D., first published as a pamphlet by the author in the late 1940s, new edition published circa 1980 with a new introduction by the Boniface Press, 8 pages. The story of the raping of German women by Allied troops, but especially the Soviets, by a revisionist author.
  • Rear Area Security in Russia: The Soviet Second Front Behind the German Lines - FREE
    • Department of the Army Pamphlet No. 20-240, Historical Study - German Report Series, Dept. of the Army, Washington, D.C., July 31, 1951, 54 pages, 2 maps. This is one of the titles in the so-called German Report Series produced by the U.S. Amy using German generals and other officers to author a variety of reports on their experiences, methods, organization, combat, etc., especially as it related to their war with the Soviet Union on the Eastern Front during World War II. These titles were produced during the early years of the Cold War when the U.S. Army fully expected to end up facing the Soviets in a future war. Thus, for the U.S. Army, these pamphlets (some of which were quite large and the term "pamphlet" does them a disservice) became a type of training manual. For the present-day historian and World War II buff, they are a source of detail not easily found elsewhere.  This pamphlet was prepared by a committee of former German generals and general staff officers under the supervision of the Historical Division, EUCOM, in the early part of 1948. All contributors had extensive experience on the eastern front during the period 1941-45. The principal author, for example, was successively G4 of an infantry division and assistant G4 of a panzer army in Russia.
  • Recognition Pictorial Manual [Aircraft]: War Dept. FM 30-30/Navy Dept. BUAER 3 - FREE
    • War Department and the Navy Department, Washington, D.C., April/June 1943, with Supplement No. 1, November 1, 1943, and Supplement No. 2, August 1, 1944, 623 photos, 224 drawings, 16 illustrations, 170 three-view silhouettes, 125 three-view tone illustrations. This recognition manual was utilized to train and educate members of the Army and Navy in how to identify the aircraft of several of the Allied and Axis nations. After a variety of softbound manuals on various nations' aircraft were produced in the early years of the war, this edition compiled it all into a single book. Produced in a loose-leaf format to aid in the addition of new pages and the replacement of outdated pages as required, the originals were held together by a shoelace (yes, really) running through two of the three holes. In this particular example, the old pages were retained and the new pages from the two supplements were merely added by the original owner.
  • Recognition Pictorial Manual of Naval Vessels: War Dept. FM 30-50/Navy Dept. NAVAER 00-80V-57 - FREE
    • War Department and the Navy Department, Washington, D.C., September 15, 1943, with pages from Supplements Nos. 2, 3, and 4 in the United States Naval Vessels section, 563 photos, 14 drawings, 2 illustrations, 134 silhouette drawings, 168 two-view drawings, 47 side view drawings. This recognition manual was utilized to train and educate members of the Army and Navy in how to identify the warships of several of the Allied and Axis nations. Produced in a loose-leaf format to aid in the addition of new pages and the replacement of outdated pages as required, the originals were held together by a shoelace (yes, really) running through two of the three holes. In this particular example, the old pages were retained and the new pages from the two supplements were merely added by the original owner.
  • Recognition Pictorial Manual on Armored Vehicles: Field Manual FM 30-40 - FREE
    • War Department, Washington, D.C., November 3, 1943, 140 pages, 258 photos, 31 drawings, 4 insignia drawings, 50 3-view drawings. Each of the 50 vehicles are covered on two or more pages, one page showing silhouette-style 3-view drawings with basic dimensions, plus additional data, characteristics and other information; the other pages showing several photographs of the vehicle in service. Contents: Introduction; Nomenclature and Recognition Features; Training; United States Armored Vehicles; British Armored Vehicles; Russian Armored Vehicles; German Armored Vehicles; Italian Armored Vehicles; Japanese Armored Vehicles.
  • Recollections and Experiences of a Stuka Pilot, 1931-1945 - FREE
    • by Paul-Werner Hozzel, Brigadier General (Ret.) GAF, originally published in February 1978, 161 pages, 16 photos, 17 maps. This account encompasses the personal experiences of a leader of dive bomber (Stuka) units in their training stages and in combat missions, from the start of the war in September 1939 through February 1943, when he was promoted and given a logistics command.
  • Report on Operations of 77th Indian Infantry Brigade in Burma, February to June 1943 - FREE
    • by Brigadier O. C. Wingate, New Delhi, India, 1943, 120 pages, 1 map, 7 drawings, 2 tables. A report to the commander of the 4th Corps on the operations of the 77th Indian Infantry Brigade in Burma from February to May 1943. This copy was compiled from two separate photocopy sets purchased from the National Archives in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Both copies were poorly done by the National Archives staff; some pages were extremely light, others very dark; in some cases a line at the top or bottom was cut off by the sloppy copying of the original. Overall, however, the text is readable and the drawings and map are clear. It also should be noted that the original in the National Archives had been censored by the CIA before this publications and thousands of documents and publications from the OSS files were turned over to the National Archives. Sections of text were redacted by black marker, varying from single words, to portions of a sentence, to whole sentences and even whole paragraphs. Overall, it represents a very small portion of the text, not even a page in total. None of the Appendices have been censored.
  • Research, Development and Production of Small Arms and Aircraft Armament of the Japanese Navy: Ordnance Technical Intelligence Report No. 19 - FREE
    • Prepared by Edward B. Bruderlin, 1st Lt., Ordnance Dept., and Robert S. Nelson, 1st Lt., Ordnance Dept., Office of the Chief Ordnance Officer, General Headquarters, Army Forces, Pacific, March 13, 1946, 120 pages, 71 photos, 20 drawings, 7 tables. This report covers the research, development and production of the small arms and aircraft armament produced by and for the Japanese Army through the end of World War II. Much detailed information on specific Japanese weapons, including pistols, rifles, submachine guns, machine guns, automatic cannon, grenade discharger, body armor, as well as spears, swords, bow and arrows, and other crude devices being prepared for use by the general Japanese populace to meet any Allied invasion of the home islands. This report was reprinted in a small soft cover booklet format in 1971 by an unidentified publisher. Apparently the poor quality of the original printing forced the reprinter to re-type the text, hence this is not an exact copy of the original publication. All of the many photographs (most illustrating the various weapons) and illustrations were reproduced by the reprinter from the original report.
  • Right of the Line: A History of the American Field Artillery - FREE
    • U.S. Army Field Artillery School, U.S. Army Field Artillery School, Ft. Sill, Oklahoma, December 1977, 40 pages. This is the Field Artillery, United States Army—the senior arm in the senior service—its position unchallenged, aptly merited by its continuous history of superiority, support, and excellence throughout the American military tradition. Formed officially in 1775, the Field Artillery, the King of Battle, has been the kingpin in the decisiveness of every key battle in which our country has participated. This booklet is published to provide its readers with some of the history and lore which inspire American Field Artillerymen.
  • Russian Combat Methods in World War II: Historical Study Department of the Army Pamphlet No. 20-230 - FREE
    • German Report Series, Dept. of the Army, Washington, D.C., November 1, 1950, 134 pages, 9 maps. This pamphlet was prepared by a committee of former German officers at the EUCOM Historical Division Interrogation Enclosure, Neustadt, Germany, in late 1947 and early 1948. All of these officers, none of which were identified by name, had extensive experience on the eastern front during the period 1941-45. The principal author, for example, commanded in succession a panzer division, a corps, a panzer army, and an army group. The "Introduction" and "Conclusions" to this study present the views of the German author without interpretation by American personnel. Throughout this pamphlet, Russian combat methods are evaluated in terms of German combat doctrine, and Russian staff methods are compared to those of the German General Staff. Tactical examples in the text were carefully dated, and an effort was made to indicate the progress of the Russian Army in overcoming the weaknesses noted in the early stages of the war. In the preparation of this revised edition (this was originally published as MS #T-22 "Peculiarities of Russian Warfare" by the Historical Division, Special Staff, U.S. Army, in June 1949), the German text was retranslated, and certain changes in typography and chapter titles were made to improve clarity and facilitate its use. The revised edition was considered to be just as reliable and sound as the text prepared by the German committee.
  • Russian T/34 (T-34 Medium Tank): Preliminary Report No. 20 - FREE
    • School of Tank Technology (STT), Egham, Great Britain, November 1943, 48 pages, 17 photos, 29 drawings, 1 four-view plan drawing. Another detailed wartime STT analysis of a foreign vehicle, the Russian T-34 medium tank, supplied by the Russian government.

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