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Civil War Era Fortifications

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Civil War Era Fortifications

Forts, Posts, Redoubts, Batteries, Camps, and Others
  • by Rodger Woltjer
    • First Edition 2008
    • 940 pages
  • PDF file on CD-ROM disk supplied by mail
  • $19.95
  • For orders outside the U.S., add $5.00 for shipping
    • This title is not published nor sold by Merriam Press
    • Orders will be filled by the author direct to customers. Send check or money orders to the author:
      • Rodger Woltjer
      • 307 Idle Pines Dr
      • Perry, GA 31069-2338
Wars are generally fought between countries, but occasionally a conflict is waged by dissenting groups within a country. Such warfare is described as a civil war. One such blemish occurred in the United States in 1861 when men from the North and South of this country could not overcome their differences largely due to the issue of slavery.

The American Civil War has fascinated history aficionados for the many years since its occurrence. The major battles and the many famous generals and officers who prosecuted the war are fixed in the minds of many whether one follows the events of the war or not. To a much lesser degree are the fortifications in existence or built during the war as defensive measures. Perhaps Fort Sumter, Charleston, South Carolina, may be known to both history enthusiasts and the casual observer, but far too many other sites are completely unknown.


Civil War Era Fortifications describes to various degrees the history of 1,624 such fortifications throughout this country. A fortification is described as a defensive structure made of brick, stone, or earth or any combination of these materials. Such structures include the commonly thought of walled forts of brick/stone, free standing buildings without a defensive perimeter referred to as a post or presidio, castles, Martello towers, redoubts, lunettes, redans, batteries, and fortified camps. Many of the more permanent structures of brick/stone were in existence prior to April, 1861, but the earthen works were often the product of defensive requirements warranted by actions on the ground during the American Civil War.


The Civil War is divided by some into two combat theaters. The Eastern Theater included those states along the eastern corridor of the Atlantic Ocean. The Western Theater was the interior states stretching to the Mississippi River or slightly beyond. A third theater without recognition and unnamed involved those states and territories west of the Mississippi River extending to the Pacific Ocean. The defenders of the fortifications in this last region were the volunteer forces from the various affected states.


As you, the reader, journey through the history of Civil War Era Fortifications look for things such as the source of the named fortification, establishment date, type of construction, defending units, and present condition. As one might expect, many of the earthen fortifications no longer exist, while the brick/stone works may be found in various states of preservation. It is not uncommon for the major forts to be part of the National Park Service either operated by the NPS or listed as a National Historic Site. Those that are not affiliated with the NPS are likely aligned with a state historical agency.


Another useful tool to be found in this CD-ROM are several reference sections that can help find a fortification by name, state/territory, or establishment date; major military commands of both the Confederate and Union armies; the political climate of the states/territories at the time; and an index that provides detail like no other. Whether you are endeared with the events of the American Civil War or a casual observer, hopefully the information contained herein will give pause to the great divide to which this nation was subjected in our past!

Contents

Dedication
Prologue
Part One - Fortification Basics
Abbreviations
Definitions
Fortification Design:
Third System Fort
Earthwork
Fortification Systems
Fort Artillery
Changing the Guard
Part Two - The Fortification
States and Territories:
Alabama
Alaska
Arizona Territory
Arkansas
California
Colorado Territory
Connecticut
Dakota Territory
Delaware
District of Columbia
Florida
Georgia
Idaho Territory
Illinois
Indian Territory (Oklahoma)
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana Territory
Nebraska Territory
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico Territory
New York
North Carolina
Ohio
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Rhode Island
South Carolina
Tennessee
Texas
Utah Territory
Vermont
Virginia
Washington Territory
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming Territory
Part Three - References & Resources
Summary of Fortification Types
Fortification Information Database
Table l - Alphabetical by Fort Name
Table 2 - Alphabetical by State/Territory
Table 3 - Fort Establishment Date
Major Military Commands:
Confederate Commands
Union Eastern Commands
Union Western Commands
Civil War Political:
Party & Vote
Secessionist States
Statehood & Ranking
Territories
State, Territory, & Troop Statistics
Bibliography
Index

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